READY FOR WORK: Members of the Proserpine Congregation are ready to see progress on the Proserpine Whitsunday Uniting Church
Back row:  Mervyn Fuller, Julianne O'Brien, Justin Burrows MiddleRow:  Lyndal Hughes, Betty Pratt, Nida Fuller, Jane Bettridge, Lyn Larkin, Max Porter, Izaac Porter, Mike Porter, Ann Porter Front Row: Christine Burrows, Abagail Moss, Nate Porter
READY FOR WORK: Members of the Proserpine Congregation are ready to see progress on the Proserpine Whitsunday Uniting Church Back row: Mervyn Fuller, Julianne O'Brien, Justin Burrows MiddleRow: Lyndal Hughes, Betty Pratt, Nida Fuller, Jane Bettridge, Lyn Larkin, Max Porter, Izaac Porter, Mike Porter, Ann Porter Front Row: Christine Burrows, Abagail Moss, Nate Porter Supplied

Church progress moving slowly, but the hard hats are on

A CHURCH with deep roots in the community may be currently out of use, but members say progress to re-open its doors is slowly being made .

There are cracks and weathered paint on its exterior, but the Proserpine Whitsunday Uniting Church wants the community to know it isn't because of a lack of love.

Damaged during Tropical Cyclone Debbie, the church has had to cordon off the main building since February this year on the advice of its insurance company, as substantial damage to the roof became apparent.

In the interim, the church has held services in its smaller hall and has worked with St Paul's Anglican Church to hold larger events and funerals using their facilities.

The church was founded in Proserpine in 1896, with the foundation stone for the current building laid in 1935.

Member of the Proserpine Whitsunday Uniting Church property committee Ross Hughes said the decision to close the church building wasn't taken lightly.

"There was quite extensive damage from the cyclone that wasn't immediately apparent and has begun to show more over time," he said.

"There are repairs needed for the safety of the roof cavity and we were advised we couldn't allow people in there for personal safety reasons."

Mr Hughes said members of the community had been surprised when funeral services were held at the Anglican Church, and wanted to let people know progress was being made on the repairs.

"We are working with the insurers to have the necessary fixes done, but it's a slow and long process," he said.

"People may have seen some cracks outside the building, paint coming off and the church sitting there looking like nothing is being done, but that couldn't be further from the truth.

"There is a lot of steps in projects like this and we want to make sure it is done right."

Mr Hughes said a new minister would be starting a the church in March who would be making it a priority to speed up the process, and in the meantime, the church committee will work alongside the insurance company.