Hamilton Plains flooding as at 9am on Tuesday, January 12. Photo: Whitsunday Regional Council
Hamilton Plains flooding as at 9am on Tuesday, January 12. Photo: Whitsunday Regional Council

Disaster relief extended to Whitsundays after Imogen deluge

Disaster relief has been extended to the Whitsundays in the wake of ex-Tropical Cyclone Imogen's rainfall dump on the region.

The money will help fund counter disaster operations and restore public infrastructure damaged in the wake of the cyclone's weakening system moving south.

Emergency Management Minister David Littleproud said the DRFA assistance would aid impacted council areas in local recovery following the flooding.

 

Hamilton Plains flooding as at 9am on Tuesday, January 12. Photo: Whitsunday Regional Council
Hamilton Plains flooding as at 9am on Tuesday, January 12. Photo: Whitsunday Regional Council

 

"Although Tropical Cyclone Imogen was downgraded to a tropical low soon after it crossed the coast on January 3, that didn't stop its excessive rainfall inundating much of north Queensland as it slowly made its way down the coast," Mr Littleproud said.

"There will be extensive work that needs to be done repairing significant damage to roads, businesses and residential properties, and this assistance will help impacted communities get back on their feet.

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"Assistance is also available for Burdekin Shire Council and Townsville City Council to deal with their clean-up efforts from Imogen, which thankfully was nowhere near as destructive as the 2019 floods."

Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Minister Mark Ryan said the money would help alleviate the cost of counter-disaster operations such as sandbagging, tree clearing and repairing road damage.

"Having brought destructive winds and heavy rain across the Gulf of Carpentaria, Cyclone Imogen proceeded to bring that flooding rainfall across a wide area from Innisfail to Airlie Beach, even cutting the Bruce Highway on Tuesday, although thankfully it has since reopened," Mr Ryan said.

 

Water rose next to Crofton Creek Bridge as at 8am Monday. Photo: Whitsunday Regional Council
Water rose next to Crofton Creek Bridge as at 8am Monday. Photo: Whitsunday Regional Council

 

"These floods damaged essential public assets, such as roads and bridges, and isolated many communities who once again have had to deal with another wetter than usual wet season."

The Commonwealth-Queensland Disaster Recovery Funding Arrangements now has financial help for Burke, Cassowary Coast, Charters Towers, Cook, Hinchinbrook, Kowanyama, Mareeba, Palm Island, Tablelands and Whitsunday.

Information on disaster assistance can be found on the Australian Government's Disaster Assist website at www.disasterassist.gov.au and the Queensland Reconstruction Authority's website at www.qra.qld.gov.au.

 

Water has subsided at Crofton Creek Bridge as at 7.30am Wednesday. Picture: Whitsunday Regional Council
Water has subsided at Crofton Creek Bridge as at 7.30am Wednesday. Picture: Whitsunday Regional Council

 

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