Persimmons often hang on the tree well after the leaves have fallen.
Persimmons often hang on the tree well after the leaves have fallen. iStock

Ever wondered what a fuyu was?

If you've seen fruit labelled as fuyu in your local fruit shop and wondered what it was, it's a type of non-astringent persimmon.

Persimmons are deciduous fruit trees with striking autumn foliage colours and delicious and decorative orange-red fruit harvested during autumn.

The colourful fruit often hang on the tree well after the leaves have fallen.

Persimmons fall into two groups - astringent and non-astringent. Non-astringent persimmons such as fuyu, ichikikijiro and izu can be eaten while they're still crisp and firm. Heart-shaped astringent persimmons, such as nightingale and hachiya, need to be fully ripened and very soft and jelly like before being eaten.

Fuyu are hardy self-pollinating persimmons that reach about 4m tall and will grow well in cool, temperate and sub-tropical climates.

Choose a spot sheltered from strong winds because the fruit-laden branches can break easily. It will take at least three years for persimmon trees to bear fruit. Persimmons can also be grown in medium to large pots.

Angie Thomas is a horticulturist at Yates.