The region's business owners are urged to be vigilant.
The region's business owners are urged to be vigilant. Megan Mackander

FAKE CASH: Counterfeit currency doing the rounds in Airlie

COUNTERFIT currency is doing the rounds in Airlie Beach and police are investigating two separate incidents involving fake cash.

The first incident is alleged to have happened between last Friday and Saturday, June 15 and June 16, at a hotel in Airlie Beach.

The second incident is alleged to have happened at about 2.42pm on Sunday, June 16 at a pharmacy on Shute Harbour Rd in Airlie Beach.

 

Can you help police identify this person?
Can you help police identify this person? Contributed

The person bought a hat, and handed over a $100 note, and was given change.

Staff scrutinised the note after the purchase, suspected it was fake and contacted police.

Whitsunday Police seized the note, and want to speak with the person involved, as police believe they may be able to help them with their investigation.

Senior Sergeant Nathan Blain said both notes seized from the separate incidents were of a good quality.

"It's just a little bit different to touch, and the ink will scratch away," Sn Sgt Blain said.

 

FAKE: Police are warning business owners to be aware when taking cash payments, after seizing counterfeit currency. When the notes are scratched near the hologram, the ink comes off, a tell tale sign they are fake.
FAKE: Police are warning business owners to be aware when taking cash payments, after seizing counterfeit currency. When the notes are scratched near the hologram, the ink comes off, a tell-tale sign they are fake. Georgia Simpson

He said only two $100 notes had been handed into police, and reminded business owners to be vigilant when taking cash payments.

He suggested cashiers give notes a "quick scratch" with their fingers to see if any ink comes off.

 

Counterfeit currency
FAKE: Police are warning business owners to be aware when taking cash payments, after seizing counterfeit currency. When the notes are scratched near the hologram, the ink comes off, a tell-tale sign they are fake. Georgia Simpson

The last time counterfeit cash was reported to Whitsunday Police was about 18 months ago, Snr Sgt Blain said.

He said the common type of fake currency police came across was purchased online.

"There is Chinese inscription writing on these notes, which are difficult to see at night, or in low-lit areas," he said.

If you come across counterfeit currency, report to the police as soon as possible on on 131 444.

You can report information about crime anonymously to Crime Stoppers, a registered charity and community volunteer organisation, by calling 1800 333 000 or via crimestoppersqld.com.au 24 hours a day.

Quote this reference number: QP1901173560.