NEW LOOK: Checking out the new mural at Proserpine Youth Space are (front, from left) Amber Neale, Sasha Radley, graffiti artist Martin Jegou, (back) youth centre assistance co-ordinator Christie Malcolm and Daniel Neale.
NEW LOOK: Checking out the new mural at Proserpine Youth Space are (front, from left) Amber Neale, Sasha Radley, graffiti artist Martin Jegou, (back) youth centre assistance co-ordinator Christie Malcolm and Daniel Neale. Monique Preston

Having a whale of a time

A FORMER "feral” wall in Proserpine has been turned into a work of art.

The wall of the side of the Proserpine Youth Space building in Dobbins Lane is now adorned with a painting of a giant humpback whale.

The painting is by graffiti artist Martin Jegou of Gwada Murals who painted it for free.

Mr Jegou put out the call on Facebook a few months ago to find a place that would allow him to paint a mural for free as a way of showing off what he could do in a highly visible spot.

At 15m long by 2.5m high, the mural is the biggest one Mr Jegou has done so far, although other pieces of his work can be found in Proserpine, Cannonvale and Airlie Beach.

Mr Jegou said he was pleased to chose the wall at Youth Space.

"I wanted my own design. Here is good because there is youth around,” he said.

"And, it's good for the outside. Freshens it up. It brings so much more brightness to the place.

"It was a good way for me to express myself and good for these guys to get colour on the wall.”

Mr Jegou estimates the mural took six full days to paint, but the process started about two months ago, with Mr Jegou painting on weekends and in his space time.

Youth Space youth care worker Viki Launder said the centre was pleased with the final product.

"He took a feral graffitied wall that was quite derogatory and turned it into something the kids can be proud of,” she said.

"It shows graffiti doesn't have to be just graffiti words on a wall. It's real art.

"The youth of Proserpine greatly appreciate the unique, inspiring mural he's done for us.”

Ms Lauder said the mural had brightened up what had been a boring space.

"(It shows) just because there's an old dead space there, it doesn't have to stay that way”. Mr Lauder said the mural had also opened up discussion with youth using the centre about sea life and the ocean, while giving them ideas about art.

"It's inspired us to clean more walls and do more (murals) ourselves,” she said.