Current member for Dawson George Christensen from the LNP, and Katter's Australian Party candidate Brendan Bunyan during the Dawson debate at the Mackay Surf Lifesaving Club.
Current member for Dawson George Christensen from the LNP, and Katter's Australian Party candidate Brendan Bunyan during the Dawson debate at the Mackay Surf Lifesaving Club. Emma Murray

How Dawson candidates want you to vote on May 18

THEY may be on opposite sides of the political spectrum, but The Greens candidate Imogen Lindenberg and Michael Turner of Fraser Anning's Conservative National Party are at the bottom of most parties' how-to-vote cards for the seat of Dawson.

Volunteers and candidates handed out preference cards to enthusiastic early voters yesterday as pre-polling opened.

In 2016 the Liberal National Party's George Christensen retained the seat by a mere 3.3 per cent due to preference flows from minor parties. He gained 42.6 per cent of first preference votes.

He is directing his supporters to send their votes to Colin Thompson from the United Australia Party followed by Brendan Bunyan of Katter's Australian Party.

His main opposition, Labor's Belinda Hassan, is directing her voters to send their preferences to Mr Bunyan followed by Ms Lindenberg.

Both Ms Hassan and Mr Christensen have listed Mr Turner, the Fraser Anning candidate, last.

Independent candidate Lachlan Queenan is preferencing Labor over the LNP. Ms Hassan is fourth in his preferences list, below Mr Bunyan and Mr Thompson.

One Nation's Debra Lawson sent her preferences to the LNP over Labor.

Katter's Australian Party has given voters the option to vote either Labor or Liberal as second preference.

Last on the KAP list is the Greens candidate Imogen Lindenberg, who sits below Fraser Anning's National Conservative Party's Michael Turner.

Democratic Labour Party candidate Ann-Maree Ware said she "won't be preferencing any party". 

She said her voters can choose where they direct their vote. 

Fraser Anning's Conservative National Party candidate Mr Turner said sitting at the bottom of most parties' how to vote cards did not bother him. 

"I think it will give us a better chance of getting the votes." 

"You can be at the top or at the bottom and that's where people will be looking," he said.

The Greens and UAP were not present at the pre-polling booth when the Daily Mercury attended. Candidates were contacted for preferences.