AUTOMATION: BMA has announced it will introduce autonomous haulage at a Central Queensland mine site. Picture: Gary Ramage.
AUTOMATION: BMA has announced it will introduce autonomous haulage at a Central Queensland mine site. Picture: Gary Ramage.

JOBS: Isaac mayor urges impact statement on BMA automation

ISAAC Regional Council has urged a mining giant to present a statement of impact in relation to plans to introduce autonomous haulage at a Central Queensland mine site.

Isaac Mayor Anne Baker was part of a delegation that travelled to Brisbane on Thursday to meet with BHP Mitsubishi Alliance asset president James Palmer after the company revealed it would roll out autonomous haulage at the Goonyella Riverside Mine over the next two years.

Cr Baker reacted to the announcement earlier this week by saying she was "flabbergasted" at the "bold and conclusive" move by BMA.

After Thursday's meeting, Cr Baker said she and the council's chief executive Gary Stevenson had a "good discussion" with Mr Palmer.

"We've asked BMA to present council with a statement of impact as soon as possible," she said.

"We're hoping to receive this in time for council to review and discuss at our ordinary meeting in Glenden on Tuesday.

Issac Regional Council Mayor Anne Baker.
Issac Regional Council Mayor Anne Baker.

"Since BMA's announcement we have been actively engaging with the relevant state agency and both sides of government to gain a better understanding on what this looks like and how the company will manage and engage with our community."

Cr Baker said it was the council and the community's expectation to be better informed of "these changes and how this will be managed in the Isaac region".

Earlier this week, the CFMEU also put forward a list of demands to BMA in a bid to stem what it claims will be "potentially hundreds of job losses" at the mine site as a result of automation.

BMA said there would be no forced employee redundancies at Goonyella Riverside as a result of the decision and there will be more than 50 new full-time permanent roles on site at the mine.

A company spokesman said during the meeting, BMA agreed with Cr Baker that "people should be central to this change".

"We know we've still got a lot of work to do … over the next two years with the community, our employees and all levels of government, including Isaac Regional Council," the spokesman said.

"We have heard that people want more information on automation, how it works and what the impacts and opportunities for the community will be.

"We look forward to continuing our conversations with (Cr) Baker and her council and thank her for meeting with us."