L-platers facing tricky new test. Picture: TMRQld/Supplied
L-platers facing tricky new test. Picture: TMRQld/Supplied

Can you pass new learner drivers’ test?

YOUNG Queenslanders hoping to get their learner driver permits will now be facing a brand new test, which may prove a bit tricker than the old written exam.

The PrepL test is fully online, a big change from the 30-question written exam, and means people can complete it on their computers, tablets or phones.

To pass the PrepL exam applicants will have to get 90 per cent or above and will have to answer a series of questions as well as participating in interactive scenarios.

We have included some of the question below so you can see how you would stack up to an L-plater.

Transport and Main Roads Minister, Mark Bailey, said the new and improved test is designed to improve the road safety knowledge of young drivers.

"Statistics show motorists aged 16 to 24 years are one of Queensland's most at-risk road user groups," Mr Bailey said.

"We are committed to reducing the burden of road trauma on our communities, because nothing is more important than the safety of people on our roads."

Unlike the old test, the new exam covers more areas than just basic road rules.
Unlike the old test, the new exam covers more areas than just basic road rules.

The new test focuses on educating drivers about proper behaviour on the road, rather than just basic road rules testing.

Mr Bailey said this ensures that learners "not only know the road rules, but also understand why they exist".

Speeding, drink and drug driving, failing to wear a seatbelt, driving while fatigued and being distracted are some of the major areas the test aims to teach learners about.

Mr Bailey said it was important to educate young people as they are 60 per cent more likely to be involved in serious crashes than experienced drivers.

He also added they are more likely to take risks and be distracted by their phones or friends.

"The new program does not only test knowledge of the road rules, but also focuses on safe driving attitudes and sharing the road with others," he said.

"We want to start conversations among new drivers and show them the consequences of poor decisions, while also making the experience interactive and engaging."

COULD YOU PASS?

We have included a few examples of the types of questions asked in the exam so you can test out your driving knowledge.

As our sister publisher news.com.au can't reveal all of the test questions, we have included some questions that are actually asked in the exam and others that have been used as examples.

 

1. You are about to merge and your lane comes to an end. Who must give way?

Who gives way? Picture: TMRQld/Supplied
Who gives way? Picture: TMRQld/Supplied

2. The bus indicates to pull out of the bus stop and the speed limit is 70km/h or less. Who gives way?

Do you know what to do? Picture: TMRQld/Supplied
Do you know what to do? Picture: TMRQld/Supplied

3. What does this sign mean?

 

What does this sign mean? Picture: TMRQld/YouTube
What does this sign mean? Picture: TMRQld/YouTube

A) Slow down and give way to vehicles crossing your path and pedestrians at or near the intersection you're turning into.

B) Come to a complete stop and then give way to all vehicles and pedestrians.

C) Give way only to vehicles on your right.

D) Give way only to pedestrians.

 

4. What does this sign tell you?

A) Winding road ahead.

Some of the questions are multiple choice while others have an interactive component. Picture: TMRQld/YouTube
Some of the questions are multiple choice while others have an interactive component. Picture: TMRQld/YouTube

B) A left curve is coming in the road ahead.

C) A right curve is coming in the road ahead.

D) Pedestrians may be crossing ahead.

 

5. Who should you give way to?

Who do you need to give way to in this picture? Picture: TMRQld/YouTube
Who do you need to give way to in this picture? Picture: TMRQld/YouTube

 

 

ANSWERS:

1) You

2) You

3) A

4) C

5) B and C.