A driver was clocked going 115km/h over the speed limit on a Gympie road last year. Picture: Brendan Radke
A driver was clocked going 115km/h over the speed limit on a Gympie road last year. Picture: Brendan Radke

Maniac caught driving 225km/h on Gympie road

A maniacal driver was caught doing an unbelievable 225km/h in the worst speeding offence caught on camera in the region last year.

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Queensland Police released the five highest speeds clocked by locally placed speed cameras in 2020, with one driver caught setting a life-threatening pace on the Bruce Highway in May.

That 225km/h mark was a ridiculous 115km/h over the posted speed limit on the highway, and outranked the second highest speeder by another 60km/h.

Police say speed is one of the main killers on Queensland roads.
Police say speed is one of the main killers on Queensland roads.

The next three worst drivers were also clocked on the highway at Coles Creek, recording speeds of 165km/h, 158km/h and 155km/h respectively.

A driver caught doing 144km/h on the Wide Bay Highway at Bells Bridge rounded out the top (or bottom) five.

A QPS spokesperson said speed remained a “major factor” in road crashes, pointing to 15 more lives lost on Gympie region roads in 2020 as a glaring issue going forward.

“Unfortunately, speed remains a major factor in many road crashes. The QPS will continue to enforce speed limits anywhere, at any time on Queensland roads to reduce road trauma, so always drive within the speed limit.

“Speeding is an acknowledged killer on Queensland roads and the prevalence of high speed is unacceptable and clearly risks the lives of the drivers and other road users.

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“In 2020 the official road toll was 276 (57 more than in 2019) and in the Wide Bay Burnett District, which incorporates Gympie was 37 (15 more than in 2019).

“The Camera Detected Offence Program is part of a multifaceted road safety strategy aiming to reduce road trauma on Queensland roads.

“As part of the program, the QPS employs a range of enforcement strategies to support compliance with posted speed limits and traffic lights at intersections, including mobile speed cameras, fixed speed cameras, combined red light speed cameras, speed camera trailers and point to point speed cameras.

“Results of an evaluation conducted by the Monash University Accident Research Centre during 2018 estimated that the program was associated with overall reductions in serious casualty crashes of 11 per cent and all casualty crashes of 6 per cent for 2016.

“This represents an annual crash saving of approximately 2,500 casualty crashes, of which around 1,650 are fatal and serious injury crashes.”