The Health Department braced for a rise in skin cancer and some schools wanted to change their hours because of a daylight saving trial.
The Health Department braced for a rise in skin cancer and some schools wanted to change their hours because of a daylight saving trial.

Panic sparked by daylight saving trial

QUEENSLAND'S Health Department braced for a rise in skin cancer and some schools wanted to change their hours because of a daylight saving trial in the summer of 1989-90, Cabinet minutes reveal.

In August 1989, Mike Ahern's government approved the test that saw clocks put forward an hour that summer.

However, within months Cabinet was dealing a series of submissions outlining the supposed faults of the move.

The test of daylight saving saw widespread support along coastal areas and in the southeast corner, according to reports to Cabinet.

 

The test of daylight saving saw widespread support along coastal areas and in the southeast corner of the state.
The test of daylight saving saw widespread support along coastal areas and in the southeast corner of the state.

 

But the trial, which ran from October 29, 1989 to March 4, 1990, was vehemently opposed in the regions and sparked tensions within the Nationals who first introduced it.

A Daylight Saving Test Task Force, which travelled across the state, reported on numerous complaints in rural areas.

Concerns were raised about an increased risk of skin cancer, problems with school transport and confusion over television viewing times, Minister for Police Vince Lester reported to Cabinet in October.

"Clearly the majority of people in the southeast area of the state as well as certain sections of the community along the coast are in favour of daylight saving," Mr Lester said in a cabinet submission.

 

 

But he warned there was opposition "predominantly by the rural sector".

In a further update to the last National Party Cabinet meeting before the December 2 election,

Mr Lester warned "there is strong opposition to daylight saving in the western areas".

A decision allowing bowls and golf clubs to vary trading times was also presented as a move to help them cope with the daylight saving trial.