A Cannonvale man has admitted to supplying marijuana to two people in April. Photo: iStock
A Cannonvale man has admitted to supplying marijuana to two people in April. Photo: iStock

‘Silliest’ drug supplier so obvious, he should put up sign

A MAGISTRATE has labelled a drug supplier the "silliest person he's seen for a long time" after the Cannonvale man organised deals over Facebook.

Aaron Lee Anderson fronted Proserpine Magistrate Court this week and pleaded guilty to three charges including two counts of supplying dangerous drugs.

Magistrate James Morton told Anderson he may as well have rung the police and told them he was going to a drug deal in the foyer of the police station, as his plan to supply the drugs was "doomed to fail".

"You may as well have put a sign up in front of your house, 'drugs here, illicit drugs here, get your cannabis'," Mr Morton said.

 

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The court heard Anderson was sent messages by two people via Facebook Messenger in April organising a supply of marijuana and he then subsequently supplied the drugs.

Police prosecutor Sergeant Jay Merchant said Anderson told one of the people he wasn't a dealer because he got the drugs from someone else so he wasn't "stuck with it".

Lawyer Peta Vernon appeared for Anderson, saying he was a "go-between" and didn't have any Queensland criminal history.

The court heard while he did have a New South Wales history, he had not previously committed drug offences.

The 38-year-old man was on disability support pension as he had previously had a stroke and had suffered paralysis on his left side, Ms Vernon said.

A Cannonvale man has admitted to supplying marijuana to two people in April.
A Cannonvale man has admitted to supplying marijuana to two people in April.

The court heard he'd had 14 operations on his brain since then and also suffered from sleep apnoea and epilepsy.

Mr Morton told Anderson that, in Queensland, only a conversation about a drug deal and not including the deal itself, would break the law.

But Anderson had gone the extra step of actually supplying the drugs twice.

"This is serious stuff, you're lucky you weren't charged with trafficking," Mr Morton said.

Anderson was fined $350 and no convictions were recorded.