Nina Cingelova, 25, and Lenka Chaloupkova, 31, say they always carry sunscreen. Picture: Tara Croser
Nina Cingelova, 25, and Lenka Chaloupkova, 31, say they always carry sunscreen. Picture: Tara Croser

Queenslanders loving the sun to death

MORE than 80 Queenslanders are being hospitalised with serious skin cancers each day as melanoma cases surge across the state.

With the Sunshine State showing no sign of losing its unenviable title as the nation's melanoma capital, health authorities are urging Queenslanders to conduct regular self-examinations of their skin.

The Courier-Mail can reveal the extent of the state's ongoing skin cancer crisis, with an average of 85 people a day being admitted to a Queensland hospital with deadly skin cancers.

New data from Queensland Health showed about 3218 people were admitted to hospital last year for treatment of malignant melanoma - the worst form of skin cancer.

Nina Cingelova, 25, and Lenka Chaloupkova, 31, say they always carry sunscreen. Picture: Tara Croser
Nina Cingelova, 25, and Lenka Chaloupkova, 31, say they always carry sunscreen. Picture: Tara Croser

A further 27,784 people were admitted for treatment of other types of skin cancers, including squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs).

Last month, The Courier-Mail revealed melanoma is the second most common cancer in the state, with around 3601 new diagnoses each year.

"Getting to know your skin and checking it regularly - for example the first of every month - is important as you will be more likely to detect any new lesions or changed to existing ones," Queensland Health's Professor H. Peter Soyer said.

"The best approach is of course prevention, through consistent use of five sun safe behaviours, with new evidence showing we should be making sunscreen part of our everyday morning routine."

An average of 85 people a day being admitted to a Queensland hospital with deadly skin cancers.
An average of 85 people a day being admitted to a Queensland hospital with deadly skin cancers.

The concerning figures come as Queensland Health reveal melanoma cases in the past decade have increased by 13 per cent of people aged 45-64 and 27 per cent of those aged over 65.

It remained the most common new cancer diagnosed for young people aged 15-29.

Shockingly, in the past 12 months and estimated 2.1 million adults, and 394,000 children in Queensland reported getting sunburnt.

Professor Soyer is urging Queenslanders to use the "ABCDE" rule to detect melanoma on their skin - asymmetrical shape, borders, colour, diameter and evolution.

Lenka Chaloupkova, 31, and Nina Cingelova, 25 are travelling around Australia and said they always carry sunscreen.

"It's really important to protect your skin," Ms Cingelova said.

"Especially because the sun in Queensland feels hotter than anywhere else we've travelled to, you can really feel when you are getting burnt."