A stockmarket trader and security consultant has been convicted of driving at 146kmh.
A stockmarket trader and security consultant has been convicted of driving at 146kmh.

Leadfoot stockmarket trader clocked at 146kmh

A Gold Coast security consultant found not guilty of a high-profile speeding charge in 2016 faced the courts again today, this time for driving at 146km/h on the Pacific Mwy.

Antonio Savic, 29, of Coomera, who was represented by star glitter strip barrister Bill Potts, faced Holland Park Magistrates Court today over the November 30, 2019, speeding incident.

The court heard police chased Savic down the motorway about 11.40pm when he sped past and clocked him at 146km/h.

Three years earlier, Savic was found not guilty of speeding after a Southport Magistrate found PolAir helicopter vision did not prove he had broken the speed limit on the M1 on the Gold Coast.

Southport Magistrate Chris Callaghan found Savic not guilty on the basis he was charged with speeding in an area where he was not speeding.

Mr Callaghan found because Savic was tracked by PolAir and his speed was estimated by measuring the time travelled, rather than by a radar gun, the true speed was not proved.

Savic was not so lucky today, when Magistrate Simon Young disqualified him for two years and issued a $1500 fine for the November 30, 2019, incident.

Antonio Savic was found not guilty of disobeying the speed limit in the Southport Magistrates Court. PolAir footage of him driving on the Gold Coast.
Antonio Savic was found not guilty of disobeying the speed limit in the Southport Magistrates Court. PolAir footage of him driving on the Gold Coast.

 

PolAir footage of Savic driving on the Gold Coast.
PolAir footage of Savic driving on the Gold Coast.

 

Mr Young also sentenced Savic to three months' jail, wholly suspended for 18 months, and a three-year disqualification, for a second offence of driving while disqualified.

It was Savic's third time in court for driving while disqualified.

"Your traffic history is poor. You defied a court order not to drive again - it was not accidental, it was deliberate,'' Mr Young said.

"You've had many years of reckless behaviour to learn (to obey court orders and drive safely).

"This court, statistically, sees more cases of disqualified driving than the state average.

"It's unfortunately something this court sees on a daily basis.''

Mr Young said Savic compounded his reckless behaviour by later being caught moving his car at a Shell service station forecourt, despite being ordered by police not to do so.

But Mr Potts said his client had sold his car to remove the temptation of driving.

He had also entered into a new relationship and his current partner had agreed to drive Savic, who had been spending up to $1000 a week on Uber fares during his disqualification period.

Mr Potts conceded prison time was within the allowable sentencing range, but argued his client's criminal history was minimal and not relevant to the speeding offence.

He also said Savic had entered a technical early plea of guilty, demonstrating his regret.

"The police officer (who pulled over Savic) deemed the speed not to be dangerous - there was no allegation of swerving,'' he said.

"It's a four-lane highway with a safe design, which is not an excuse but is by way of explanation.''

Mr Potts also said his client was "clearly a person of ambition'' as he was a self-employed security consultant who had plans to expand his business, and also was a day trader on the stockmarket.

He said Savic accepted he had a legal and moral obligation not to put others in danger.

Mr Young ordered the two periods of disqualification be served concurrently.

 

Originally published as Third strike for leadfoot clocked at 146kmh