GREEDY: Fat Guts the crocodile was removed from Proserpine River last month as a result of illegal feeding.
GREEDY: Fat Guts the crocodile was removed from Proserpine River last month as a result of illegal feeding. Contributed

Wave goodbye: Fat Guts has officially left the building

ICONIC crocodile Fat Guts reigned supreme down the Bruce Highway on Wednesday as he was transported to his new home.

A Department of Environment and Science spokesperson said Fat Guts had been permanently moved to Koorana Crocodile Farm, near Rockhampton.

The farm has more than 5000 crocodiles and was established in 1981 as Queensland's first commercial crocodile farm and Fat Guts will be used to provide education about crocodile ecology and conservation, as well as being used for breeding.

The Department of Environment and Science said in a statement the 4.5 metre icon crocodile was transported in a custom-built trailer, and the journey took about 12 hours.

"After assessing bids from different crocodile farms and zoos, Koorana Crocodile Farm was chosen as the new home for the crocodile," the statement said.

Fat Guts was targeted for removal from the Proserpine River in late January after a member of the public reported seeing a crocodile with a rope trailing from its mouth.

Department of Environment and Science senior wildlife officer Tony Frisby said in a statement the crocodile was displaying behaviour consistent with an animal that had been regularly fed.

Under the Queensland Crocodile Management plan, any crocodile that develops an association between humans and food availability is likely to be considered a crocodile displaying dangerous behaviour.

It is illegal to feed crocodiles in Queensland and any crocodile displaying dangerous behaviour that poses a threat to humans is removed.

The Proserpine River has one of the highest densities of crocodiles in any Queensland river system.

Since the iconic crocodile's removal, a sign has been put in place near the public landing warning people not to feed the creatures, along with a number of other safety messages.

The sign was erected on Tuesday by the Department of Environment and Science.

Members of the public are encouraged to report crocodile sightings as soon as possible by phoning 1300130372.