With the population set to grow faster than the state's average over the next 20 years, real estate agents have explained how the housing market could develop to cope with the burgeoning community.
With the population set to grow faster than the state's average over the next 20 years, real estate agents have explained how the housing market could develop to cope with the burgeoning community. Tourism Whitsundays

Where houses could be built next as population climbs

WITH THE region's population set to grow faster than the state's average over the next 20 years, real estate agents have explained how the housing market could develop to cope with the burgeoning community.

Ray White principal Mark Beale said blocks with water views were always going to be the most sought after, but as the region grew and the demand outstripped the supply, people would have to look at other areas to develop. Mr Beale said areas around Sugarloaf, Riordanvale, Woodwark, Cannon Valley and Strathdickie could begin to open up even more, and although they may not have glimpses of the Coral Sea, the appeal of larger blocks would be alluring for many wanting space.

A 2018 Whitsunday Region Economic and Population Study (EPS) 2018 identifies the highest rate of growth for the region is between Cannon Valley and Jubilee Pocket, particularly on the under developed fringes but within the Urban Area.

Taylors Property Specialists principal Rob Taylor said there was "plenty of land” in the region for development.

Mr Taylor said between Jubilee Pocket and Cannon- vale up to Paluma Rd, there were estimated to be 314 privately owned vacant residential type blocks under 1200 square meters.

A Whitsunday Regional Council spokesman said there was just 353ha of residential land earmarked for potential development in the Airlie Beach/Cannonvale catchment and just over 63 ha in Jubilee Pocket/Shute Harbour catchment.

The spokesman said Airlie Beach had enough land for development until 2036 but unless the landowner wanted to sell, it would remain undeveloped, he said.

In just 20 years, the number of dwellings is set to sky rocket to 16,060 with the number to hit more than 28,000.

The great Australian dream of home ownership with a big backyard, is largely the reason why the public has supported urban sprawl.

Luckily for the Whitsundays the region has a vast amount of space not privy in metropolitan centres, and the spokesman said the general expectation for people living in regional Queensland is everyone has room for a backyard, big shed, boat and a caravan.

The spokesman said the region wasn't in any danger of running out developmental land, and it would be a 'long, long time' before they must tackle those issues.