Retired Queensland and international test cricketer Brendan Nash, Queensland Cricket area manager Blake Rutherford with the WBBL trophy and Proserpine Junior Cricket players Archer Philipson, (middle) Emerson Baker, Oliver Wilson, Angus Hardy-Young, Nicholas Philipson, (front) Chiara Johnson, Zahra Kale and Hartley Kale.
Retired Queensland and international test cricketer Brendan Nash, Queensland Cricket area manager Blake Rutherford with the WBBL trophy and Proserpine Junior Cricket players Archer Philipson, (middle) Emerson Baker, Oliver Wilson, Angus Hardy-Young, Nicholas Philipson, (front) Chiara Johnson, Zahra Kale and Hartley Kale. Shannen McDonald

'You can make it': Star sportsman inspires junior cricketers

HAVING grown up in Cairns, Brendan Nash is proof that a youngster from regional Queensland can make it to the big time.

Identified as a potential talent at age 12, Nash went on to play for Queensland and also played international Test cricket for the West Indies.

As Proserpine Junior Cricket looks forward to the start of another season, players were treated to a visit from Nash, who took a shiny token of success with him to help inspire the aspiring cricket stars.

The juniors were excited to get up close with both a cricketing great, and the Women's Big Bash League trophy won by the Brisbane Heat women last season, during their season sign-up last night.

Now retired, Nash said he relished opportunities to inspire young cricket stars in the state's regional areas.

"Growing up in Cairns, I can relate to the boys and girls here in Proserpine, as a now ambassador for the sport," he said.

"I love giving back to the sport and coming to the smaller, regional areas like this and I think they really appreciate not only my time, but Queensland Cricket's time and what they're trying to do for the game in general."

Nash spent seven years from 2000 to 2007 playing for Queensland, before two years of Test cricket with the West Indies, an opportunity spurred on by his Jamaican parents.

After playing at a professional level for more than a decade, Nash said his drive to continue to play cricket always came down to the passion he continued to hold for the sport.

"For today's inspiring cricketers, I really encourage playing for the love of the game," he said.

"I learnt while at a professional level, the reason to keep going.

"It's amazing that you end up going back to the reason you started playing the game, and that's for the love of it.

"Have fun and enjoy the game and you just never know what might happen.

"There will be some sacrifices you need to make, but I've shown as a boy from a regional area, you can make it."